About Iphone 3G S..

June 20, 2009

Apple has added some nice features to the iPhone with its latest hardware and software upgrade, but it could and should have done more.

Since launching the iPhone, Apple has been the pacesetter for the industry for interface, design and attracting outside developers. The updates will make the phone even more compelling for consumers and programmers.

The new iPhone 3G S is faster than previous models and, unlike them, can shoot and edit video. Meanwhile, its new software, iPhone OS 3.0, which comes pre-installed on the 3G S and can be downloaded for earlier models, brings long-awaited features such as copy-and-paste and cool surprises such as peer-to-peer networking.

But the iPhone is still missing one key feature: the ability to run multiple programs at once. And in terms of user interface — the way a consumer interacts with a device — the iPhone has surrendered the lead to Palm’s new Pre.

If you’re shopping for a new smart-phone, you should strongly consider both the 3G S and the Pre. If you’ve already got the iPhone 3G, it’s debatable whether the 3G S is worth the cost of the new phone or the extension of your contract with AT&T for another two years.

Compared with my iPhone 3G, the 3G S loads programs, shoots pictures and displays text I’ve typed considerably faster. I started up a music game, Leaf Trombone, on both devices at the same time. I could start playing on the 3G S while the 3G was still loading

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Leading white goods and mobile handset manufacturer Samsung Wednesday launched a low-cost solar-powered mobile phone, and said it was planning to introduce about 20 more models by year-end.

The new handset, launched under its low-cost line of products – ‘Guru’ – at a price of Rs.2,799, has a solar panel on the back, which can be used to charge the battery anywhere the sun is shining.

‘We have developed this phone keeping in minds the needs of the consumers, especially for people in areas where the electric supply is unstable,’ said J.S. Shin, president and chief executive of Samsung, Southwest Asia.

The phone, christened the ‘Guru E1107’, can provide around 5-10 minutes of talk-time with one-hour of solar charging when the handset is turned off and sunlight has adequate intensity.

‘Solar charging can give you enough time to make few important calls when there is no electricity or you are not close to a plug point,’ said Sunil Dutt, country head of Samsung India.

The battery will attain full power with about 40 hours of solar charging.

‘But that is really not the intention behind the launch of this phone. It is to enable customers to make a call when there is no electricity,’ said Dutt.

The handset, the 11th model in the Guru series, will be in shops by month-end.

The first few batches of Guru E1107 will be imported from South Korea.

Saumsung has already launched about 20 models this year and plans to take this number to about 40 across categories.

Asked whether the company would consider introducing solar charging features in high-end phones, Dutt said: ‘We would definitely consider doing so.’

Samsung, which has invested about $44 million in developing its mobile manufacturing facility in Noida, also has ambitious plans for the huge Indian mobile market.

‘Our market share is in the early double digits currently. We plan to increase it by about 5-6 percent this year,’ said a company official.

Tamil Tigers leader Velupillai Prabhakaran was tortured by the Sri Lankan military before being killed, a leading human rights body said in a report released Wednesday.

The University Teachers for Human Rights (UTHR) quoted high-level military sources as saying that Prabhakaran was tortured in the presence of ‘a Tamil government politician and a general’.

The torture, it said, took place probably at the headquarters of the army’s 53 Division, which battled the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam (LTTE) before crushing it last month.

‘Several army sources have said that Prabhakaran’s (younger) 12-year-old son Balachandran was killed after capture. Our (sources) said that he was killed in front of his father,’ said UTHR, which has always been critical of excesses both by the military and the LTTE.

‘These sources added that this information is correct unless officers at the highest level are fibbing to one another.

‘Our sources in addition to several others have said that all the LTTE persons remaining in the NFZ (No Fire Zone) were massacred,’ it added in a 48-page report, an advance copy of which was made available to IANS.

Sri Lanka announced May 18 that Prabhakaran, founder leader of the LTTE, was killed in a lonely coastal stretch in the northeastern district of Mullaitivu where the Tigers had massed their forces before going down.

His body was put on display, placed on a stretcher, the back of the head blown off.

Sri Lankan minister Vinayagamurthy Muralitharan alias Karuna, a former confidant of Prabhakaran, had told IANS that the LTTE chief was shot dead with 18 of his guards.

Prabhakaran’s death marked the end of the LTTE’s dragging conflict that claimed 90,000 lives since 1983.

UTHR said: ‘Information seeping into the public domain from within the army points to capture or surrender, but the official responses dismissing this are a rehash of stories that public no longer finds credible. It is left to an impartial enquiry to answer this and related questions.’

UTHR pointed out that the government was evasive about the fate of Prabhakaran’s wife Mathivathani.

It quotes a brigadier as saying: ‘We had to look for Prabhakaran’s body because the world was interested in seeing it. But the body of his wife is not of any importance to us.’

The UTHR report said: ‘That would be the fate of the unknown hundreds of civilians and militants killed in those last days (of fighting).’

According to the report, among the LTTE leaders who surrendered to the army included Baby Subramaniam, a member of the group since 1976 and one of Prabhakaran’s oldest associates.

U.S. President Barack Obama’s ‘Say no to Bangalore, yes to Buffalo’ rhetoric, which has gained strong ground after the introduction of the Durbin-Grassley’s anti H-1B visa bill, has failed to accrue support of the American companies. Many of the U.S. firms have jointly, launched a campaign against the newly proposed law as it would lead to a job loss of as many as 2.2 million Americans.

The Technology CEO Council, a Washington-based advocacy group of U.S. American tech-companies, in its protest has released a report that reveals the affects of the new policy of Obama administration to end ‘tax breaks’. The new law that ends tax incentives to those firms which create jobs overseas, would also lead to a decline in investments in the U.S. plants, equipment and property by as much as $84.2 billion. Repealing or sharply limiting deferral would not generate large tax revenues, since substantial job losses, wage cuts and lower investments would reduce tax revenues, the report said. The report commissioned by the council has been authored by Robert J Shapiro, a former Clinton administration economic official, and Aparna Mathur, a Research Fellow at the American Enterprise Institute.

As per the new law, the tax incentives would now go to those creating jobs inside the United States, in places like Buffalo city, bordering Canada in upstate New York. “We will stop letting American companies that create jobs overseas take deductions on their expenses when they do not pay any American taxes on their profits,” Obama said.

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Depending on whether the Sinhala majority reacts to its military victory with magnanimity or triumphalism, Tamils may grow hopeful of a political solution to the decades-old ethnic conflict or feel physically vulnerable and politically marginalised. thumb.cms

The immediate concern is not the fear of ethnic violence or unrest of the sort that shook the region in 1983, but the approach of the Mahinda Rajapaksa regime. “I fear Rajapaksa may be keen to broaden his Sinhala support base rather than providing a constitutional solution,” says V Suryanarayan, South Asia expert. Blog: No tears for Prabhakaran The meeting came as state television and defence officials announced that Tamil Tiger leader Velupillai Prabhakaran and the entire rebel leadership had been killed on Monday by government troops. Sri Lanka’s state television station announced on Monday that Tamil Tiger rebel chief Velupillai Prabhakaran has been killed, and the army commander said the last pockets of rebel resistance have been cleared from the north. Prabhakaran’s death would spell the end of a more than three-decade quest by the rebel leader for a separate state for minority Tamils across northern and eastern Sri Lanka. Rupavahini television, the state broadcaster, broke into its regular programming Monday afternoon to announce Prabakharan’s death. They gave no details of how he was killed. The government information department also sent a text message to cell phones across the country announcing Prabhakaran was killed along with his top deputies, who were known as Soosai and Pottu Amman. Sri Lanka’s army chief, Lt. Gen. Sareth Fonseka, told television his troops routed the last rebels from the northern war zone Monday morning and were working to identify Prabhakaran’s body from among the dead. Blog: Memories of Jaffna He noted that despite the election of a Tamil-led regime in the Eastern Province, there was no headway in devolving powers to it. He said any solution that the government might come up with would just be one put together by “the victor over the vanquished”. A key obstacle in the post-conflict scenario is the absence of a strong, credible figure or political alliance to represent the Tamils. Without the cooperation of the moderate Tamil section, it would be difficult for the Sri Lankan government to regain the confidence of the Tamil people. The only hope is that moderates, liberals and intellectuals among Tamils may regain the voice that has been stifled for years because of the LTTE’s intolerance of dissenting views on one side and violent opposition to federal alternatives from the Sinhala right. Moderate Sinhalese opinion in Sri Lanka is that India may be in a better position to lean on Colombo to offer a political solution now than when the LTTE factor weighed on the issue. “Now that the LTTE is not part of the equation, India can seek justice for Tamils more vocally,” said a Colombo resident.